Corridos

Download PDF

The Basics

 

Subject

Social Studies, History of the U.S.

Targeted grade level

5th grade GT/Bilingual

 

Standards

Texas S.S. TEKS 5.22b

(B) Explain how examples of art, music, and literature reflect the times during which they were created.

 

The Lesson

 

Introduction

During this five-day unit, the students will explore the Corrido genre due to its prominence in the Southwest region of the United States, especially in Texas and other art forms can be used as additional primary sources.  Corridos work as a primary source because they are usually written very soon, if not immediately, after an event has occurred by a Corridista (a Corrido writer) and continues with the long tradition of oral history, evolving to the Spanish Romances and then becoming Corridos, or ballads.  The reason to approach several time periods though one genre is two-fold. First, so that the student can get a working understanding of the corrido genre and how it expresses thoughts and ideas of people during a specific time period and two, to compare and contrast the themes expressed in different time periods, such as disenfranchisement, immigration, cultural differences, Vietnam, Kennedy’s assassination and others.  This song genre was specifically selected due to my classroom’s student population, which is made up entirely of Spanish-speaking students and its long tradition in this region of the United States.

 

This lesson, spanning four to five 60 minutes class periods, will help students to more richly understand how different forms of art was used to reflect that times that it was created.  I am using the Corrido genre since that is a very popular genre in the Southwest region of the U.S., specifically Texas, and the students would be familiar with it.  You may wish to change the song genre to best fit your needs.  Using the Corrido, we will do a quick survey of 3 different periods in U.S. history starting with the early 1800’s, to 1963 and current era to demonstrate how music reflects the times that it was created and give us a better understanding of that time period.

Objectives

The student understands the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created and the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to the United States.

 

Resources/Materials:

Songs:

"El Corrido de Kiansas"  

Composer unknown. A Texas Mexican Cancionero: Folksongs of the Lower Border. Chicago: University of Illinois Press. 1976.  Composed in early 1860s it is the oldest complete corrido.  Original composer and dates unknown.  Recommended recording Los Palomares de Ojinaga, video rec. by Chris Strachwitz and Jaime Nicolopulos, Presidio, TX, November 2, 1997. This corrido tells about a cattle drive from Texas to Kansas and its excitement and dangers. 

 

"El Corrido de Gregorio Cortez" c. 1910

VAT 6.32. Composer unknown.  Performed by Jesus Maya and Timoteo Cantu on Borderland: from Conjunto to Chicken Scratch.  New York: Folkways [SF CDE40418] 1993. This corrido depicts the true story of Gregorio Cortez, who was wanted on a false charge of theft due to a deficient Spanish-English translation, a shoot out occurs and the sheriff kills Gregorio’s brother and Gregorio kills the sheriff.  A manhunt ensues, Gregorio gets captured and put in jail.

"Corrido de Joaquin Murrieta"

Written in the early 1900s attributed to the Lorona brothers of Oquitoa, Sonora.  Raices Latinas Smithsonian Folkways Latino Roots Collection 2002.  Honors the actions of Joaquin Murrieta, who moved to California from Sonora during the years of the Gold Rush in the mid-19th century.  After Anglo vigilantes had killed his wife, he took revenge, becoming a symbols of Latino resistance to cultural and economic oppression by forces of Anglo society. (Filipe Valdez Leal-Jorge Sanchez/Peer International, BMI)  Luis Mendez- vocal and guitar, Guadalupe Bracamonte –guitar, from Heroes and Horses: Corridos of the Arizona-Sonoran borderlands (2002) SFW CD 40475.  Recorded compiled and annotated by James Griffith.  Recorded in March, 1995 in Caborca, Sonora.

"El Corrido del Padre de un Soldado"

Perfomed by Flaco Jimenez and Toby Torres in their record Un mojado sin licencia, label Del Bravo, Released Sept. 01, 2012.  This corrido is about the prayers of a father for his son and other soldiers going to war in Vietnam.

 

"El corrido 720  Ayer y Hoy N.M.’s 720 Bound for War"

By Los Reyes de Albuquerque.  Written by Roberto Martinez, 1991.  This was written by the author when he was on his way to El Paso to say good bye to a group of soldiers heading out to Kuwait.

 

"El corrido de Daniel Fernandez"  

This song is about the first Hispanic New Mexican killed in the Vietnam War,  demonstrate the continuity, vitality and viability of the modern corridor tradition.  Played in a Mariachi style by one of the most influential of all contemporary New Mexican groups.  This is an original composition by Roberto Martinez, one of the Southwest’s most active corridistas.  The popularity of this song brought fame to the Reyes of Albuquerque, leading to an active schedule of concerts, recordings, and national recognition.  Recorded in Albuquerque, September 24, 1991.

 

"El Homenaje a John F. Kennedy"

Written by Jose A. Morante (1963), performed by Jose Morante and Los Conquistadores, Pepe y Agustin, accompanied by Los Arcos.  45 RPM, Norteno label #NO-221A-TNT music-BMI, San Antonio, TX.  The composer wrote this after listening to other corridos about Kennedy and not liking what he heard because they only focused on the assassination and missed the life and achievements of the fallen president.

 

"Corrido de Cesar Chavez"

Performed by Los Perros del Pueblo: Miguel Gabriel Vasquez, Lorenzo Martinez; Davis Maestas (from Rolas de Aztlan, Songs of the Chicano Movement Smithsonian Folkways 40516, 2005)  The United Farm Workers organized to fight the mistreatment of migrant workers in the U.S./ During the Delano grape strike (1965-1970) in 1966.  The UFW stage a 300-mile march.  This tribute to Cesar Chavez, its leader, was composed during the march by Felipe Cantu, and it was first performed at the state capitol. (Russel Rodriguez and Estevan Cesar Azcona, notes to SFW 40516)

 

"Mojado"

Composed and performed by Ricardo Arjona featuring Intocable Sony BMG Music, 2005

Videos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3QQmf343i0 "El Corrido de Kiansis" as performed by Los Palomares de Ojinaga.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJ7irflWmm8 "Corrido of Joaquin Murrieta" performed by Lydia Mendoza.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9Jp4p8_fH8 "Corrido de Gregorio Cortez" performed by Ramon Ayala y los Bravos del Norte.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bjlcPZ_Tjx0 "Homenaje a John F. Kennedy" as performed by Los Conquistadores, Pepe y Agustin, accompanied by Los Arcos.  45 RPM, Norteno label #NO-221A-TNT music-BMI, San Antonio, TX.

http://farmworkermovement.com/media/teatro/index.shtml "El Corrido de Cesar Chavez" recorded  by El Teatro Campesino was recorded on the Viva la Causa- Songs and  Sounds from the Delano Strike! Which was distributed by the United Farm Workers but  it is now out of print.  It recounts the farm workers pilgrimage from Delano to Sacramento, CA in March,  1966.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjdmaxDMeUI "Mojado" as performed by Ricardo Arjona e Intocable Sony BMG Music, 2005

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHsTItGoTBg "Mojadoas" performed by Ricardo Arjona (this version comes with English lyrics and is in a rock style instead of the ballad/corridor style of the other video)

 

Books:

Musica Nortena: Mexican Migrants Creating a Nation between Nations, Cathy Ragland; Temple University Press, Philadelphia, 2009

Corridos in Migrant Memory, Martha I. Chew Sanchez; University of New Mexico Press, 2006

The Kennedy Corridos: A Study of the Ballads of a Mexican American Hero, Dan William Dickey; The University Printing Division of The University of Texas at Austin, 1978.

List of discussion questions and vocabulary:

General Questions for every day-What type of song is this? Where would it be played? When would it be played? Who would be the audience? What instruments do they hear? What about the voices? Does it sound like anything they’ve heard before?

 

Procedures

Day One- PRIMARY SOURCES AND CATTLE DRIVE

Since the students studied Texas History in 4th grade, they are familiar with cattle drives from Texas to Kansas.  This will already give them a historical background for understanding the song.  If the students are not familiar with the cattle drives, they will receive a quick overview while discussing the song.

 

Tell the students that by the end of the unit, they will have to explain what is a corrido, how can we use it or any other songs as primary sources and compare/contrast today’s song with previous song or a self-selected song.  

 

Play “Corrido de Kiansis” for students. Ask them to take a seat and listen to the music. (5 min)

 

After the first listening, ask questions: What type of song is this? Where would it be played? When would it be played? Who would be the audience? What instruments do they hear? What about the voices? Does it sound like anything they’ve heard before?  Record the student responses on a circle map graphic organizer. (5 min)

 

After the discussion, ask the students to listen to the song again and this time give them the lyrics to the song and the Finding Patterns graphic organizer labeled with two categories: Voice and Music to focus their listening. (5 min)

 

Give the students time record what they think about the music, the lyrics and anything else that comes to their minds. (5 min)

 

The students copy in their own graphic organizer the notes taken by the teacher. As this is taking place, the teacher shares more information about the song, the corrido genre and the time it was composed and what was happening during that period in U.S. history and about what is a primary source. This is done to clarify students’ previous educated guesses. (15 min)

 

Hand out the Plotting the Story graphic organizer to the students and using the lyrics they fill it in. (5 min)

 

Student turn in an “out” ticket with a reflection of El Corrido de Kiansis.  Does it reflect its time period and why is it a corrido and not another music genre? Is this a good example of a primary source or not and why? (15 min)

Extension: Students find/draw images that could go with that corrido.  Sing the corrido as a class and act it out.

Day Two - BORDERLANDS RELATIONS

Today we will be listening to another corridos, compare them and explore how these corridos are representative of their time period.

 

Remind the students that by the end of the unit, they will have to explain what is a corrido, how can we use it or any other songs as primary sources and compare/contrast today’s song with previous song or a self-selected song.  

Play “Corrido of Gregorio Cortez” for students and ask them to listen and think about the music using the questions from day 1.  (5 min)

 

After the first listening, ask the students to listen again to it but this time hand out the Finding Patterns graphic organizer labeled with two categories: Voice and Music to focus their listening and for them to record their ideas. (5 min)

 

Hand out the Plotting the Story Explanation about the "Corrido of Gregorio Cortez" and students work in small groups to fill it in with the lyrics. (5 min)

 

Teacher then hands out the Compare/Contrast Graphic Organizer models filling in one column of the Compare/Contrast graphic organizer.  The students copy in their own graphic organizer the notes taken by the teacher. (5 min)

 

Students are placed in small groups or pairs to listen to a new corrido, “El corrido de Joaquin Murrieta.”  Working in their small groups they work on filling a Finding Patterns organizer and a Plotting the Story organizer. Monitor and discuss the song with the students.  (30 minutes).

 

Discussion about the similarities and difference between the two corridos and filling in of the Compare/Contrast graphic organizer and pick up at end of class. (10 min)

 

Extension/Homework: Students can compare/contrast “El corrido de Kiansas” to any of the other two corridos we listened in class today.

Students create illustrations based on the song lyrics/music.  Create a movie/video about telling the corrido story.  Compare different versions of the same corrido.


Day Three- WAR

Remind the students that by the end of the unit, they will have to explain what is a corrido, how can we use it or any other songs as primary sources and compare/contrast today’s song with previous song or a self-selected song

 

Play “Corrido del Padre de un Soldado” for students and ask them to listen and think about the music using the questions from the previous day. (5 min)

 

After the first listening, ask the students to listen again to it and hand out the Finding Patterns graphic organizer labeled with two categories: Voice and Music to focus their listening and for them to record their ideas. (5 min)

 

Discussion about the “Corrido del Padre de un Soldado.” (15 min)

 

Students are placed in small groups or pairs to listen to a new corrido, “El corrido de Daniel Fernandez.”

 

Working in their small groups they work on filling a Finding Patterns organizer and a Compare/Contrast graphic organizer. Monitor students and the work. (15 minutes).

 

Discussion about the similarities and difference between the two corridos and filling in of the Compare/Contrast graphic organizer and pick up at end of class. (20 min)

 

Extension/Homework:  Fill in a Plot the Story Graphic Organizer with today’s corridos. Students create illustrations based on the song lyrics/music.  Compare “Corrido de Julian Perez” with “Corrido de Joaquin Murrieta,” “Gregorio Cortez” or “Daniel Fernandez.”

Day Four - IMMIGRATION

(Mojado in this song is used as a slang term, not a derogatory term, you may choose other corridos or another song genre to compare and contrast with a corrido)

 

Remind the students that by the end of the unit, they will have to explain what is a corrido, how can we use it or any other songs as primary sources and compare/contrast today’s song with previous song or a self-selected song

 

Start the lesson by giving the students a mini-lesson on what is primary source. (5-10 min)

 

Play “Mojado” for students and ask them to listen and think about the music using the questions from the previous day.  (5 min)

Ask the students to listen again to “Mojado” and working independently, the students receive a Finding Patterns organizer, a Compare/Contrast graphic organizer, a Finding Patterns graphic organizer and a Plot the Story organizer to use in his/her task.  

Allow student to work in small group or independently to complete the unit’s closing activity. (40-45 minutes).

 

Extension/Homework: Students write their own corridos using http://www.corridos.org/ and share it with the class.

 

Students create illustrations based on the song lyrics/music to other corridos.

 

Students find other songs to explore, compare and contrast.

Day Five – EVALUATION

The student will work independently or in small groups to complete the following task.

 

By the end of the period they must have the following:

  • A short explanation of what is a corrido
  • Compare/Contrast graphic organizer comparing today’s song with another song
  • A short explanation of why songs and other art forms can be used as primary sources.
  • An example of a self-selected song or art form and how it reflects the times when it was created.

 (60 minutes).

Closure

For the closing activities every day, we will have an activity to reinforce what we have learned in class about the music genre, analyzing a song, and creating another product based on their personal interests using menus.

Evaluation

The students will be evaluated daily based on their “exit” slips and their final project. Explanation of the corrido genre and arguments for use of songs and other art forms as primary documents in the study of American History and an example of how they would use a song at the end of the unit.

Reflection

Coming from Texas and seeing Texas History as a jumping point, I began this project by attempting to find the earliest record of Spanish music (music with lyrics in Spanish) in America (the continent) and follow it as it evolved through the U.S. starting from the Southwest region. My research led me to the Spanish romances and how those traveled to America and then changed to become what we now know as Corridos.  Due to the very strong Spanish, later Mexican, influence in the Southwest region of the U.S. and the distinct geographical location the corrido took a very important role in expressing the feelings of the Mexican and Tejanos during that time period, expressing in Spanish what they could not or would not express in English, expressing their resentment to Anglo colonization, their experiences during the cattle drives, the life on the range, and the longing for the motherland among other feelings.

With the German immigration into Texas, the accordion became a part of the conjunto, giving it another sound, a mix of polka with ranchero music.  So the sound changed a bit and became the basis for what we now know as Tex-Mex and Tejano music later on. Even though the times have changed, some issues have changed and other remain the same, the corridos are still being sung today, telling stories from the past as well as from our present, also represented by a tie to certain instruments, rhythms and song structure to the old and also evolving with electronic instruments and mixing with other song styles as presented through these selection of corridos.  I selected the corridos genre due to their prevalence in Texas and knowing that my students would be familiar with them and would be a great base to get them to think about how other songs styles and art forms tell us about a certain period in history when they were created.


 

"Corrido de Kiansas" (also known as Quinientos novillos)


Cuando salimos de Kiansas

Con la fuerte novillada

!hay que trabajos pasamos

En aquella gran llanada.

 

Quinientos novillos eran, 
toros bravos y livianos;
no los pudieron parar 
entre veinte americanos.

En la Hacienda de Pirules 
se soltó un toro bragado
y el caporal lo siguió 
en su caballo "el melado".

Como el caballo era nuevo 
todo se le fue en correr,

el caporal les decía:
—¡Ya no pensaba volver!—


La mamá de un vaquero 
le pregunta al caporal:
--¿Qué razón me da de mi hijo 
que no lo he visto llegar?--

—Señora, si le dijera, 
triste se pondría a llorar:
su hijo lo ha matado un toro 
en las trancas de un corral—.

Ya no tengo qué cantarles 
y por eso me despido,
aquí termina el corrido
de los quinientos novillos



"
Corrido de Kiansis" (500 Steers)

 

When we left for Kansas 
with a mighty herd of cattle,
Oh, what hardships we had
on that great plain!

There were five hundred steers, 
plus some brave and quick bulls, 
and twenty American cowboys 
couldn't stop them.

In the Hacienda of Pirules 
a very macho bull left the herd
and the overseer followed it 
on his honey-colored horse.

Because the horse was young, 

it did nothing but gallop.
The overseer told us: 
"I didn't think I was coming back!"

The mother of a vaquero
asked the overseer:
"Can you tell me anything about my son? 
I have not seen him arrive."

"Lady, I would tell you, 
but you are going to cry in grief:
a bull killed your son 
against the rails of a corral."

I have no more to sing to you 
and so I say farewell,
here ends the corrido 
of the five hundred steers.



"Corrido de Joaquin Murrieta"

Señores, soy Mexicano                            

pero comprendo el inglés                

Me lo aprendí con mi hermano

al derecho y al revés                       

A cualquier americano                   

lo hago temblar a mis pies.             

 

Cuando apenas era un niño               

huérfano a mí me dejaron.               

Nadie me hizo ni un cariño,             

a mi hermano lo mataron,                

a mi esposa Carmelita,                  

cobardes la asesinaron

 

Yo me vine de Hermosillo                 

enbusca de oro y riquezas.               

Al indio noble y sencillo               

lo defendí con fiereza.                 

A buen precio los sherifes            

pagaban por mi cabeza.                  

 

Yo soy ese que domino                    

hasta leones africanos.                 

Por eso salgo al camino                 

a matar americanos.                     

Ya no es otro mi destino.               

¡Pon cuidado, parroquianos!             

 

Murrieta decia una cosa                    

La tenia que cumplir                    

-Vengo a vengar a mi esposa,             

se los vuelvo a repetir,                 

Carmelita tan hermosa,                  

cómo la hicieron sufrir.-                

 

Por cantinas me he metido,              

castigando americanos.                  

-Fuiste tú aquel general                

El que mataste a mi hermano.            

Lo agarraste indefenso,                 

orgulloso americano.-                   

Yo no soy chileno extraño               

en esta tierra que piso.                 

De México es California,                

porque Dios así lo quiso                

Y en mi sarape cosido                   

traigo la fé del bautismo.              

 

Ya vamos de retirada

Todos vamos al cuartel

Con bastante caballada

Cien mil pesos en papel.

Ahi les encargo a Tres dedos

Que es mi compañero fiel.                

Bonito el pueblo de

Stockton con sus calles alineadas,               

donde paseaba Murrieta                  

en su silla bien plateada

con su pistola repleta,                 

y la gente alborotada.                  

 

Yo he paseado en California             

por el año del cincuenta,                

en mi montura plateada,                

y mi pistola repleta,                     

Yo soy aquel mexicano                  

Mi nombre es Joaquín Murrieta.          
  

 


"Ballad of Joaquin Murrieta"

Gentlemen, I am Mexican

but English I understand

I learned it with my brother

forwards and backwards.

I make any Anglo

tremble at my feet.

 

When I was barely a child

I was left an orphan.

No one gave me a bit of affection,

They killed my brother,

some cowards

killed my wife Carmelita.

 

I came from Hermosillo

in search of gold and riches.

I defended the poor and simple indian with fierceness.

And the sheriffs put a good price on my head.

 

I am the one who dominateseven African lions.

That's why I set out To kill Anglos.

My destiny is no other.Beware, country men!

 

Whatever Murrieta promised

He’d make sure to make it true.

“I come to avenge my wife,

and I say again,

how they made my lovely Carmelita

suffer so much.”

 

I entered many a saloon,

punishing Anglos.

"You must be the captain

who killed my brother.

You found him unarmed,

proud Anglo."

 

I'm neither Chilean nor a foreigner

to this land I tread.

California belongs to Mexico

because God wished it so.

And in my stitched sarape

I carry my baptismal certificate.

 

How beautiful Stockton is

with its streets aligned,

where Murrieta passed by

with his silver-plated saddle,

with his pistol loaded and the people out to cheer.

 

I have traveled in California around the year '50 [1850]

with my silver-plated saddle

and my pistol loaded.

I am that Mexican

My name is Joaquín Murrieta.

 


"Corrido del padre de un soldado"


Soy un padre como hay muchos,
que no hayamos que pensar
pues tenemos nuestros hijos
allá peleando en Viet Nam,
Virgencita milagrosa
devuelvelos como se van.

Diosito santo te pido
que tengas más compasión
de nuestros hijos queridos
que andan en otra nación.
Bien sabes que se llevaron
parte de mi corazón.

Virgen divina, 
Virgencita de San Juán,
protege a todo el soldado
que nos defiende en Viet Nam.

“Adios mis padres queridos,”
nos dijo casi al partir,
dijo “no se queden tristes
que pronto he de venir.
soy purito mexicano
y no le temo al morir.”

Se despidió de su novia,
de sus hermanos también,
le dió un abrazo a su madre,
y a mí me dió otro también.
Se encomendó ante nosotros,
y ante Diosito también

Diosito santo, tu sabes
lo que una madre sufrió
para darle vida a su hijo
hasta la vida arriesgó
a cambio de la de mi hijo
mi vida te ofrezco yo.

Virgen divina, 
Virgencita de San Juán,
protege a todo el soldado
que nos defiende en Viet Nam.



 

"Ballad of a soldier’s father"

I am a father, like many others,                                 

we don't know what to think
because we have our sons
over there fighting in Viet Nam.
Miraculous Virgin
return them as they left.

Dear God, I ask you
that you have greater compassion
of our dear sons
that are in another nation.
You know well that they took with them
part of my heart.

Divine Virgin,
Dear Virgin of San Juan,
protect all the soldiers
that defend us in Viet Nam.

Goodbye my dear parents
he told us as he left
he said “Don't be sad,
soon I will return.
I am a real Mexican
and I am not afraid to die.

He said goodbye to his fiancee,
and to his brothers, too.
He hugged his mother,
and he also gave me one, too.
He asked for our blessing
and for the Dear Lord's too.

Dear Lord, you know
what a mother has suffered
to give life to her son
she risked her life,
in exchange for that of my son.
I offer you my own life.

Divine Virgin
Dear Virgin of San Juan
protect all the soldiers
that defend us in Viet Nam

 

 

 

"The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez"

In the county of Karnes
Look what has happened;
The Major Sheriff died,
Leaving Román badly wounded.

The following day, in the morning
When people arrived;
They said to one another,
"It is not known who killed him."

They went around asking questions,
About half an hour afterward,
They found that the wrongdoer
Had been Gregorio Cortez.

Now they have outlawed Cortez
Throughout the whole state;
Let him be taken, dead or alive;
He has killed several men.

Then said Gregorio Cortez,
With his pistol in his hand,
"I don't regret that I killed him;
I regret my brother's death."

Then said Gregorio Cortez,
And his soul was all aflame,
"I don't regret that I killed him;
A man must defend himself."

Then the Americans said,
"If we catch up with him, what shall we do?
If we fight him man to man,
Very few of us will return."

The Americans were coming,
They were whiter than a dove,
From the fear that they had
Of Cortez and of his pistol.

Then the Americans said,
Then they said fearfully, (30)
"Come, let us follow the trail;
The wrongdoer is Cortez."

Cortez says to Juan,
"At last you are going to see it;
Go tell the rangers
To come and arrest me."

When they surrounded the house,
Cortez suddenly appeared before them,
"You will take me if I'm willing,
But not any other way."

Now they have taken Cortez,
Now matters are at an end;
His poor family
Are suffering in their hearts.



 

"Corrido de Gregorio Cortez"

En el condado del Carmen 
miren lo que ha sucedido, 
Murió el sherife mayor 
quedando Román herido. 

Otro día por la mañana 
cuando la gente llegó, 
Unos a los otros dicen 
“no saben quien lo mató.” 
‎ 
Se anduvieron informando 
como tres horas después, 
Supieron que el malhechor 
era Gregorio Cortez. 
 
Insortaron a Cortez 
por toditito el estado 
Vivo o muerto que se aprehenda 
porque a varios ha matado. 
‎ 
Decía Gregorio Cortez 
con su pistola en la mano, 
‎--No siento haberlo matado 
al que siento es a mi hermano.-- 
‎ 
Decía Gregorio Cortez 
con su alma muy encendida, 
‎--No siento haberlo matado 
la defensa es permitida.-- 


Decían los americanos 
‎--Si lo vemos qué le hacemos, 
si le entramos por derecho 
muy poquitos volveremos.—

Gregorio le dice a Juan, 
‎--Muy pronto lo vas a ver, 
anda háblale a los sherifes 
que me vengan a aprehender.-- 

Cuando llegan los sherifes 
Gregorio se presentó, 
‎--Por la buena si me llevan 
porque de otro modo no.—

Ya agarraron a Cortez 
ya terminó la cuestión, 
la pobre de su familia 
la lleva en el corazón. 


 

"Corrido de Daniel Fernandez"

Amigos vengo a cantarles

el corrido de un paisano

se llamo Daniel Fernandez,

hijo nuevomexicano.

 

Este soldado valiente,

valiente de nuestro estado

por el amor a su patria,

la vida a sacrificado.

 

Su vida fue terminada,

murio en batalla mortal.

Ahora se encuentra con Dios

en su reino celestial.

 

En el pueblo de los lunas,

fue el lugar donde nacio

Y en el sur de Vietnam,

fue el lugar donde murio.

 

Era grande de estatura

y grande de corazón

Y a nuestra patria querida

le sirvio con devoción.

 

Nuevo Mexico querido,

no des tu brazo a torcer

Tienes soldados valientes

que cumplen con su deber.

(gritos)

 

Decia este gran soldado

Cuando se vio mal herido

-Virgencita milagrosa,

Nomas un favor te pido.

Dame un momento de vida

Para rezarte un Rosario.

Despues madrecita mia

Content me voy contigo.-

 

Ya con esta me despido

Paseandome en estos valles

Aqui se acaba el corrido

Del gran soldado Fernandez.


 

"Corrido de Daniel Fernandez"

Friends, I come to sing to you

The ballad of a countrymam

His name, Daniel Fernandez,

New Mexico’s son.

 

This brave soldier

Brave from our state

Because of loving this homeland

His life has sacrificed.

 

His life ended,

He died in mortal battle

Now he is with God

In his celestial kingdom.

 

In the town of Los lunas,

Was where he was born

And in the south of Vietnam,

Was where he died.

 

Era grande de estatura

y grande de corazón

Y a nuestra patria querida

le sirvio con devoción.

 

My dearest Nuevo Mexico

Do not give up!

You have brave soldiers

Who fulfill their duty.

(gritos)

 

Said this great soldier

When he saw himself mortally wounded

-Miraculous virgin,

I ask only one favor.

Give me a moment of life

To pray a Rosary.

Then, my dear mother,

I’ll go contently with you.-

 

I say farewell with these lines

Traveling through these valleys

Here end the ballad

Of the great soldier Fernandez.

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2011-2016 Center for American Music, University of Pittsburgh Library System